Journal of Biomaterials

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Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality

Received: 6 February 2024    Accepted: 22 February 2024    Published: 13 March 2024
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Abstract

The suitability of nettle plants for the production of pulp and paper was thoroughly examined, with special consideration given to the plant’s chemical compositions, morphological analysis, and kraft pulping qualities. The mean values of cell wall thickness, fiber length, lumen width, runkel ratio, and nettle plant diameter were found to be 7.4 μm, 55 mm, 4.9 μm, 2.4 and 16.9 μm, respectively. Although nettle plant fibers have a stronger cell wall, their physical properties are comparable to another biomass. The chemical composition investigation found that the contents of nettle plants were 64.8 weight percent holocellulose, 38.7 weight percent alpha-cellulose, 16.8 weight percent lignin, and 5.8 weight percent ash. Additionally, 8.4 weight percent were discovered in the 1% alkaline extractives of nettle leaves. The kraft pulping process of nettle plants needed a low chemical charge and lower boiling time when compared to a number of other non-wood raw materials utilized in the papermaking process. Despite these circumstances, kraft-pulped nettle plants yielded a high-yield bleachable grade pulp. Kraft pulp produced from bleached nettle plants had strength properties that were comparable to those of other biomass for pulp and papermaking materials. Overall, this present research show that nettle plants, which have morphological and chemical characteristics comparable to those of traditional papermaking materials, have a bright future as a source of pulp and paper.

DOI 10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11
Published in Journal of Biomaterials (Volume 8, Issue 1, June 2024)
Page(s) 1-14
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Nettle Plant (Steam), Kraft Pulping, Fiber Resources, Fiber Morphology, Chemical Compositions

References
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  • APA Style

    Tekleyohanis, T., Woldeyes, B. (2024). Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality. Journal of Biomaterials, 8(1), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11

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    ACS Style

    Tekleyohanis, T.; Woldeyes, B. Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality. J. Biomater. 2024, 8(1), 1-14. doi: 10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11

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    AMA Style

    Tekleyohanis T, Woldeyes B. Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality. J Biomater. 2024;8(1):1-14. doi: 10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11,
      author = {Tsiye Tekleyohanis and Belay Woldeyes},
      title = {Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality},
      journal = {Journal of Biomaterials},
      volume = {8},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-14},
      doi = {10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.jb.20240801.11},
      abstract = {The suitability of nettle plants for the production of pulp and paper was thoroughly examined, with special consideration given to the plant’s chemical compositions, morphological analysis, and kraft pulping qualities. The mean values of cell wall thickness, fiber length, lumen width, runkel ratio, and nettle plant diameter were found to be 7.4 μm, 55 mm, 4.9 μm, 2.4 and 16.9 μm, respectively. Although nettle plant fibers have a stronger cell wall, their physical properties are comparable to another biomass. The chemical composition investigation found that the contents of nettle plants were 64.8 weight percent holocellulose, 38.7 weight percent alpha-cellulose, 16.8 weight percent lignin, and 5.8 weight percent ash. Additionally, 8.4 weight percent were discovered in the 1% alkaline extractives of nettle leaves. The kraft pulping process of nettle plants needed a low chemical charge and lower boiling time when compared to a number of other non-wood raw materials utilized in the papermaking process. Despite these circumstances, kraft-pulped nettle plants yielded a high-yield bleachable grade pulp. Kraft pulp produced from bleached nettle plants had strength properties that were comparable to those of other biomass for pulp and papermaking materials. Overall, this present research show that nettle plants, which have morphological and chemical characteristics comparable to those of traditional papermaking materials, have a bright future as a source of pulp and paper.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Optimizing Kraft Pulping Conditions to Improve Nettle Plant Pulp Quality
    AU  - Tsiye Tekleyohanis
    AU  - Belay Woldeyes
    Y1  - 2024/03/13
    PY  - 2024
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11
    T2  - Journal of Biomaterials
    JF  - Journal of Biomaterials
    JO  - Journal of Biomaterials
    SP  - 1
    EP  - 14
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2640-2629
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.jb.20240801.11
    AB  - The suitability of nettle plants for the production of pulp and paper was thoroughly examined, with special consideration given to the plant’s chemical compositions, morphological analysis, and kraft pulping qualities. The mean values of cell wall thickness, fiber length, lumen width, runkel ratio, and nettle plant diameter were found to be 7.4 μm, 55 mm, 4.9 μm, 2.4 and 16.9 μm, respectively. Although nettle plant fibers have a stronger cell wall, their physical properties are comparable to another biomass. The chemical composition investigation found that the contents of nettle plants were 64.8 weight percent holocellulose, 38.7 weight percent alpha-cellulose, 16.8 weight percent lignin, and 5.8 weight percent ash. Additionally, 8.4 weight percent were discovered in the 1% alkaline extractives of nettle leaves. The kraft pulping process of nettle plants needed a low chemical charge and lower boiling time when compared to a number of other non-wood raw materials utilized in the papermaking process. Despite these circumstances, kraft-pulped nettle plants yielded a high-yield bleachable grade pulp. Kraft pulp produced from bleached nettle plants had strength properties that were comparable to those of other biomass for pulp and papermaking materials. Overall, this present research show that nettle plants, which have morphological and chemical characteristics comparable to those of traditional papermaking materials, have a bright future as a source of pulp and paper.
    
    VL  - 8
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Department of Chemical Engineering, Debre Berhan University, Debre Behan, Ethiopia

  • Department of Chemical Engineering, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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